The Student News Site of Wofford College

Old Gold & Black

Breaking News
  • Issue 7 Out Now!

Old Gold & Black

Old Gold & Black

OPINION: Men’s Basketball just won’t back down
Abigail Taylor, Contributing writer • February 27, 2024

Editor Adventures

Addie and Elaine take a break from the student editors’ workshop to calm down their swooning. Here, they ruin a beautiful photo of the view from the New York Times building.
Addie and Elaine take a break from the student editors’ workshop to calm down their swooning. Here, they ruin a beautiful photo of the view from the New York Times building.

By: Addie Lawrence and Elaine Best, Editors

E: Over spring break, Addie and I were invited to the New York Times’ annual student editors’ workshop, where we got to hang out with student editors from across the nation and learn from NYT staff members all about journalism.  And we were very calm about it. Super calm.  Some people thought we had found Enlightenment, we seemed so calm. And we had – journalism enlightenment, that is.

A: If by calm you mean “foaming at the mouth from excitement,” then yes. The workshop began with an editorial lesson by Andrew Rosenthal, the editor of the NYT’s editorial page, and continued with editing exercises, journalism ethics (for example, is it unethical for me to write about Elaine’s habit of hoarding pizza crusts in her closet and stroking them at midnight?) and the chance to share our experiences and advice as student editors. After presentations on digital media and foreign correspondents, we were so full of information (and tiny sandwiches) that we could hardly process the sheer awesomeness of what we’d just experienced.

E: There is nothing wrong about loving a good pizza crust. I could also discuss the ethics of putting Addie’s number on Craigslist under an ad that says she’s giving away free ferrets all named Mop. (Any interested customers should text Addie a photo of a ferret. And a mop.).  Anyway, after the workshop, we were set loose on the Big Apple. Sadly, we found few apples, but there was a lot of pizza, hot dogs and coffee to choose from. As we approached Times Square, an ambulance drove through followed by someone dressed as Spiderman.

Story continues below advertisement

A: I would like to emphasize that this was our first experience in the city. Not only did he chase the ambulance, but he made sound effects too. We were the Peter Parkers of the scenario, cataloguing his exploits for a news story – this very article in fact. But our main mission in Times Square was to get cheap tickets to one of those fancy northern theater things (Boardway?). We were lucky and snagged some cheap, second row seats to the cheerful classic, “Les Miserables.”

E: I think the reason we were seated so close to the stage was so when Addie and I foamed at the mouth (we’re actually getting tested for rabies – apparently it’s unnatural to have this much foam happening in our mouths), the foam would not get on the other guests. Heaven forbid we angered Ron, our dutiful and terrifying usher.

A: One poor soul accidentally touched the stage. Ron turned him into a puddle of fear and self-loathing with a single, withering look. Simply put, the show was amazing. We had caught the theater bug and were ready for another show.

E: Our next theater experience, however, was much less straitlaced as we ventured off to experience “Drunk Shakespeare,” a show where one actor takes five shots before performing a Shakespeare play. In our case, we witnessed a sobering version of “Macbeth.”

A: The cast seamlessly incorporated perfect Shakespearean monologues with dance off battles and jorts. It should also be noted that the “stage” was a sketchy library on the fourth floor of a building. Some of the bookshelves had been neatly repurposed into a bar.

E: Other highlights of the trip included falling in love with Monet at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, freezing in the rain as we strutted through Central Park, accidentally finding Vincent van Gogh’s ear and experiencing what we can only determine was an urban, bicycle version of polo. As much as I despise Addie, I must say, we had a grand old time in New York.

Moral of the story:

E: “Til death do us part” – it seems we failed that one, Addie. But no worries – there will be plenty of times to off you in the future. Cheers, my Terriers – thanks for a great year in news. Editor, out!

A: It’s been a pleasure being your editor, Wofford. Start spreading the news, we’re leaving in May.

Donate to Old Gold & Black
$0
$500
Contributed
Our Goal

Your donation will support the student journalists of Wofford College. Your contribution will allow us to purchase equipment and cover our annual website hosting costs.

More to Discover
Donate to Old Gold & Black
$0
$500
Contributed
Our Goal