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Old Gold & Black

Old Gold & Black

Scott Kull: The new Director of Athletics
Abigail Taylor, Contributing Writer • April 16, 2024

Nitty gritty Granada: The ins and outs of Granada, Spain

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By: Kelsey Aylor, Staff Writer

I previously wrote an article introducing myself and an opinion piece on the differences between Spanish and American politics and the issues within them. This week I decided I should introduce where I will actually be studying!

Granada is the capital city of the province of Granada and is home to about 250,000 people. It’s located in southern Spain, or Andalusia, so it has a very distinct history and culture from that of northern Spain. Yes, siestas and tapas are popular throughout the whole country, but Granada is uniquely it’s own.

The region has a much stronger Muslim influence due to the emirate, and later caliphate, that was established hundreds of years ago.  Probably the most recognizable structure from this era, and of the city in general, is the Alhambra, a palace and fortress complex that also contains gorgeous gardens.

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I live on the outskirts of the Realejo barrio, or the historically Jewish neighborhood. Realejo has many of charming cafés that are great to stop in for Segundo desayuno (second breakfast) and also a few plazas where there are markets or other fun activities set up on the weekend.

Bordering either side of my neighborhood is the city center, or the Albaicín barrio. The city center is much more developed and I associate it more with shopping and food than anything else. On the main street, you can find Burger King, Dunkin Donuts and H&M, so I would consider it the area most comparable to home. That isn’t to say, though, that the city center doesn’t have tucked away corners and great finds! There are some really cool artisanal shops and quirky tapas places nearby, not to mention the historic food market and the cathedral.

The Albaicín area is a maze that you will get lost in, but it has the prettiest views and some of the most historic sites. The neighborhood is the traditional Muslim neighborhood and has massive hills, curving roads and hidden plazas. There are also the miradores, or viewing points, that are great places to go for a sunset picnic.

There are other neighborhoods in the city, but these three are the ones I visit the most. There are also various pueblos, or towns, that surround the city. Many university students live here and commute into the city for class.

Overall, the city is the perfect size for me. I can walk from either end within 30 minutes, and although some of the major streets are very crowded and busy (including hordes of tourists), there are also quiet and hidden back roads and plazas that I have had the pleasure to sit in and work on homework. Although everything is so new, I feel perfectly at home with the smaller city feel and the extremely welcoming people. It also doesn’t hurt that there’s a gelato shop on any given street corner for that midday pick me up.

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