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Old Gold & Black

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Old Gold & Black

Old Gold & Black

Scott Kull: The new Director of Athletics
Abigail Taylor, Contributing Writer • April 16, 2024

Farewell, Wofford

Farewell%2C+Wofford

By: Kelsey Aylor, editor-in-chief

Amidst the hustle and bustle of my fast-approaching graduation, I’ve had to very intentionally set aside portions of time to allow myself to sit still, to reflect, and to really consider my time at Wofford for the past four years. And it’s impossible to consider my time at Wofford without also considering the literal blood, sweat and tears that I’ve given to the Old Gold and Black.

Like many an overzealous freshman, I signed up for way too many clubs an organizations at the fall interest fair, with the student newspaper being one of them. Little did I know then that I would fall in love with journalism and become impassioned to help create a publication by the students and for the students. In four years my roles have included: shy, meek volunteer who was over the moon when then-editor, Sari Imber (now Sari Moore), gave me praise; staff writer who felt emboldened in her writing (what isn’t more reassuring than a salary am I right?); and now editor-in-chief.

I’ll admit, I was a bit begrudging taking this position at first. In the three years prior, I had seen a lot of ugliness directed at the heads of the paper – students, faculty, parents, alumni and even unrelated parties who happened to see some articles circulating online had all sent in their scathing critiques, accusing our writers of disrespect, prejudice and complacency even – you would think we were guilty of instilling absolute anarchy on campus.

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And some of those criticisms have remained during my time as editor – and, yes, they’ve been hard to deal with at times. I question whether my leadership has been effective, whether I’ve helped to make a positive difference with my writing.

However, when I think of our staff, I am assured that the answers to all of my doubts and questions are yes, yes, a thousand times yes. On a campus where some of the ugliest aspects of conservatism can rear their ugly heads, I am astounded to look at my staff and see the diverse backgrounds, interests and perspectives they provide.

My time at Wofford, much like my time as editor, has come with its fair share of heartbreak and outrage. I have felt the sorrow shared on campus due to the untimely passing of members of our student body. I have seen and heard racist remarks being thrown around as if it were the most blasé thing in the world. I have watched as dear friends are shaken to their cores following incidents of sexual assault and violence.

Many of these stories and issues would never have found the light of day were it not for the students, the ones whom I feel so honored to work with, who work passionately and tirelessly. The students who desire to give a voice to those who may feel unimportant or overlooked. The students who still believe in the power of writing, despite the growing blast against print media and burgeoning accusations of fake and biased news.

Serving the Old Gold and Black has been an exercise in patience and in growing thicker skin. But it has also been one of thoughtfulness and respect, one of empowerment.

So as I try to reflect on my time with Old Gold and Blackas well as consider its future direction, lyrics from one of my favorite songs currently keep coming to mind: “I’m happy right now, so I’m nervous / because there’s always the calm before the storm / because I don’t want to be set on fire and burn quickly / I’m cheering for love.”

Over the past four years, I’ve seen that the campus culture here has undoubtedly changed for the better. I’m overjoyed to have been able to witness and participate in that change, and I’d like to think that much of it has been both sparked and documented by this publication.

However, I will be the first to admit that there are so many ways in which Wofford can improve. I know that change will be difficult. It will likely be inflammatory, volatile and increasingly personal. But the passion for truthfulness, justice and equality I’ve felt and received does not have to end for me after graduation, nor does it need to be ignited after something outrageous happens only to die down a few weeks later.

Wofford has been set on fire to change for the better, and this fire should not burn out quickly. It should continue on through students, faculty and staff. Because in the end, shouldn’t we all be cheering for love?

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